Read NMN’s conversation with “In The Dead of Night” writer and composer Claudio Macor and Paul Boyd

 

In The Dead of Night

NMN’s Peter Auker recently caught up with Claudio Macor and Paul Boyd, writer and composer of the current film-noir inspired sensation playing at The Landor Theatre, In The Dead of Night.

 

You’ll find a brief snippet of the conversation to whet your appetite below, but you can read the full discussion HERE.

 

Peter Auker: Claudio, perhaps you could you give us a quick introduction to the play and its setting?

 

Claudio Macor: Well it’s set in South America, or somewhere in South America – not in a specific place but somewhere I’ve created. It’s called La Roca, which is a shanty town, and it’s set in a bar down by the docks. The bar is owned by Elvira, an aging prostitute who has a gigolo Massimo and a prostitute Rita working for her. It’s basically the machinations of the various characters – there’s a corrupt government official Falchi, who is in love with Elvira, who comes in and threatens to knock everything down and get rid of everything. Of course, the play is a film noir style, and it is written in a film noir dialogue style.

 

PA: So in fact it’s not actually a film that you have transferred to the stage?

 

CM: No, it’s not based on a film – it’s not based on Gilda or Casablanca or Double Indemnity or any of those films, but when you see it you’ll see flavours of all those films, and inspiration from all those films because I do love the film noir genre very much. It comes off the back of having done The Tailor Made Man first of all as a play and then as a musical a couple of years ago. I’ve done the play eight times, and in those various productions, both in London and off-Broadway, I was lucky to meet a lot of people who knew William Haines or who had worked in the Hollywood system. And after having done the musical I thought “I wonder what the film noir films, would have been like if they had been allowed free rein, they would have allowed no censorship, no production code, and no bombastic film moguls screaming at writers and directors to keep more tame. That got my mind going and I thought “what if I did my film noir with everything they were not allowed to do – gay love story, drugs, crime, prostitutes, everything that they were not allowed to do in the 1940s.

 

PA: Real life, in fact.

 

CM: Exactly – real life, but in a film noir style.

 

READ THE FULL CONVERSATION HERE


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